Inventing the Cave Man: From Darwin to the Flintstones (Studies in Popular Culture) por Andrew Horrall

Inventing the Cave Man: From Darwin to the Flintstones (Studies in Popular Culture) por Andrew Horrall
Titulo del libro : Inventing the Cave Man: From Darwin to the Flintstones (Studies in Popular Culture)
Autor : Andrew Horrall

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Andrew Horrall con Inventing the Cave Man: From Darwin to the Flintstones (Studies in Popular Culture)

Críticas 'Canadian archivist Horrall explores the caveman character as conceived from its Victorian imaginings to the present. Juxtaposing his history against early man's Darwinian roots, Horrall presents a caveman whose history is one part contrived and one part idealized. Spread throughout the book are illustrations and newspaper clippings from popular Victorian publications from the 1800s and on, including Vanity Fair, the Dundee Evening Post, and Punch. Of note is Horrall's chapter on the ""missing link"" concept and how the caveman image was transformed by Tennyson Reed, the first artist to depict cavemen comically. Reed's illustrations gained a foothold in modern society, transforming the stereotypical aggressive Neanderthal that threatened Victorian mores into a powerless comical absurdity. This ability to embed a satirized caveman into the Victorian literary mind would forever alter its contemporary existence with society, leading to cartoons like enduringly humorous The Flintstones. Inventing the Cave Man presents both a serious yet academically humorous narrative of how early Victorians would have consumed and embellished on the caveman image. The book's entertaining and lighthearted approach to a subject that is easily overlooked within the canon of prehistory is a helpful one, allowing casual researchers an easy read.' J. Jocson-Singh, Leonard Lief Library, Lehman College CUNY, Choice connect, July 2018 Vol. 55, No. 11 -- . Reseña del editor Fred Flintstone may have lived in a sunny Stone Age American suburb, but his ancestors were respectable middle-class Victorians.  This book traces the cave man character in modern popular culture to its roots in Victorian London. Beginning with reactions to Darwinian ideas, the discovery of gorillas and the remains of ancient hominids in the 1850s, it shows how elite knowledge was continually reshaped and reimagined for mass audiences in cartoons, songs, sketches, plays and jokes. The first explicitly simian creatures evolved over time to become proto-human ‘missing links’, until the 1890s when cave men who inhabited an archaic version of nineteenth-century Britain emerged. This prehistoric world was used to send-up late-Victorian ideals and institutions, while simultaneously suggesting that they had existed from the beginning of time. The character spread throughout the empire and across the Atlantic at the turn of the century, where American cartoonists and filmmakers cemented it in global popular culture. Throughout, the history of cave men provides insights into ideas of gender, class, race and religion. Making extensive and innovative use of digitised newspapers and magazines from throughout Britain, the empire and the United States, Inventing the cave man reveals the long-running popularity of comic prehistory in cartoons, magazines, music halls, songs and popular plays. It contributes significantly to our understanding of the Victorian turn of mind, tracing a forgotten aspect of British popular culture that remains visible in the twenty-first century. Ver Descripción del producto